You’re familiar with the business side of Altitude. But are you aware that there is a philanthropic side?

In the few months that I have been interning at Altitude Marketing, I realize this agency does much more than just provide integrated marketing services to its B2B clients. 

Altitude has a history of giving back to the community, and several of my team members volunteer at local organizations. Donations, time and shared expertise are all ways Altitude makes a difference throughout the Lehigh Valley region.

B2B Marketing + Giving Back: Two Sides to Altitude (Featured Image)

Donations

A percentage of Altitude’s profits are donated to causes that have meaning to some or all of its team members. This allows these nonprofit organizations to fund initiatives, expand resources or use for other expenditures.

I was present when Andrew Stanten, President, Altitude Marketing, presented a check for $5,000 to Wildlands Conservancy this past December. The Wildlands will use the money to help the organization secure, preserve and protect open spaces in the region. It felt good to be involved that day.

“Among its many projects and efforts in our region, The Wildlands preserves and protects 350 acres and more than 9 miles of trails on South Mountain in Emmaus – just outside the front door of our corporate headquarters,” Stanten said. “I’ve been hiking and biking and taking my family on nature walks on that property for the last 25 years. It’s an amazing place to get some exercise and clear your head.” 

Altitude made other monetary donations in 2020, including $2,400 to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Lehigh Valley to support two Big/Little relationships. 

“It is so important for kids to have a good adult role model, to help them see possibilities and imagine themselves in a better situation,” Stanten said. “When I learned that two of our employees were actively involved in the organization, I knew we had to help.” 

Altitude also donated $2,500 to Community Bike Works, an organization dedicated to empowering people and teaching life lessons through bikes and bike repair. 

“As an avid cyclist, I ride more than 3,000 mile a year, and I get so many physical and mental benefits being on the bike,” Stanten said. “The programs Community Bike Works have to teach young kids to fix bikes and earn the bike they fix is an amazing opportunity for them to learn a lot about themselves and get a great sense of pride.” 

No matter the organization, Altitude makes it a priority to donate to causes that have a meaningful impact for Lehigh Valley residents. 

Time

“When some people hear the words ‘giving back,’ they may assume the only way to help is through financial support, but that is not always the case,” Stanten said. 

Many members of Team Altitude dedicate their time to an organization. Louis Holzman, Director, Business Development, and Sally Reigle, graphic designer, are volunteers for Big Brothers Big Sisters, each having their own “Little” to mentor and spend time with.

Gwen Shields, Altitude’s COO, donated countless hours last year raising $18,000+ serving as a fundraising ambassador for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Adam Smartschan, Chief Strategy Officer, serves on the board of several nonprofit organizations, including SAMPS

“When the cause or organization hits home, it doesn’t feel like you’re giving up your time,” Shields said. “You’re just doing something that you love.” 

Shared Expertise

Altitude also offers professional guidance. Andrew offers pro bono consulting services to the clients of Ben Franklin Technology Partners, sits on the Advisory Committee for the Bridgeworks Enterprise Center in Allentown, Pennsylvania, served on the board of the Rising Tide Community Loan Fund and taught Marketing Basics courses for the Small Business Development Center. 

“Sharing expertise to help others is true joy,” Stanten said. “Some of the best things you could give are your unique insights and knowledge to those who are in the same place you were once in, helping them succeed and become more skillful in their professional roles.” 

Altitude also has a robust intern program and has taken on several interns per year, every year, for the past 12+ years. 

“As a college student, the most important thing to have on your resume is real-world experience,” Stanten said. “Internships give young adults a true advantage when they graduate. I love that we played a role in helping some of our past interns go on to have amazing careers at places like LinkedIn, SurveyMonkey and D&B. Of course, I prefer when they stick around and make a career with us!”

Currently 6 of Altitude’s 24 full-time employees started as interns. Altitude’s leaders also go to local colleges where they give advice and motivational speeches to students about the transition to being a young professional.

This is where I enter the picture.

Stanten and Altitude digital marketing coordinator Kyle Krajewski, a former Altitude intern and graduate of Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, visited my campus about a year ago as part of a panel offering career advice and guidance. At the time, I was President of the American Advertising Federation at Kutztown. As a follow up Stanten and Krajewski’s visit to campus, we set up an open house at Altitude. My fellow club members and I met Altitude’s employees, took a tour of the office and sat down with Stanten to pick his brain about the marketing industry.

After that visit to the agency’s office, I knew this would be a great place to intern. I felt I could really learn a lot while being a part of this work family. Fast forward to my senior year (now) when I connected with an Altitude employee to inquire about an intern position: I was transferred to the right people within the company, went through the interview process and here I am – getting the hands-on internship experience I sought.